Blog Posts

July 26: a day off…or two?

I wish there was a class I could take that would help me make better decisions. We could call it Probability and Decision Making. And it could be taught in the winter term. I’m sure they could find someone competent to teach it. Or maybe I just need a crystal ball.

I took a motel room in Terrace Bay last night. I needed the comfort of a bed. My air mattress sprung a leak the night previous…and I didn’t want to sleep on the hard cold ground. (I tried the soapy water trick to find the leak…but found nothing. Grrr. The nearest Canadian Tire is a day ride from here.)

Anyways. I woke up this morning with a body quite resolute that It was not cycling today. So I took the day off (my last day off was in Winnipeg). I replanned my route once again, and checked the weather forecast to see what kind of winds I can expect over the next couple of days. Nothing too concerning.

Well let’s just say that the forecast has changed drastically since this morning. Right now the forecast is for a high of 14 tomorrow…with lots of rain and thunderstorms. Sigh. It’s a 83km ride to Marathon with a lot of climbing. So even under good conditions it would be a solid day of pedalling.

I’m so far behind my original schedule it’s laughable. According to the plan my pajama wearing, wine drinking self made back in January, I should be well east of Sault Ste. Marie by now.

So…two days off?

July something: Broken but unbowed

I haven’t been posting stuff the last couple of days. I’m having a tough go at it. Northern Ontario is ruthless, relentless, and wrothful.

Google is a tool

And I don’t mean that nicely. The stretch from Fort Frances to Thunder Bay was incredibly tough and stressful. It was really hard to plan a day around access to drinking water. Google listed service stations and convenience stores that aren’t open anymore. And it didn’t list others that are. Not knowing where you’ll be able to get water next is really stressful!

Mind your tires!

With my focus on avoiding thunderstorms, tornadoes, and stressing about water, I wasn’t paying enough attention to my bike. Specifically, my back tire. When I finally got east of Thunder Bay I took a moment to do some quick maintenance on my bike…which is when I realized my back tire was worn right down…to the point where the orange hey-you-need-to-change-your-tire paint was visible. I was nowhere near anything at this point.

Canada’s smallest Canadian Tire for the win!

I was able to get to Nipigon on the tire and went into Canada’s smallest Canadian Tire with the faintest hope that they’d have a tire that fit my rim (I needed a 700×32). They did not. BUT Jason—an avid cyclist who was working at Canadian Tire that day—told me that he’d help me out. He had a tire at his house that he was willing to give me (a 700×25). I graciously took him up on his offer. Turns out Jason is the owner of the store! So peeps…next time you’re going through Nipigon, stop in at Canada’s smallest Canadian Tire and show them some love. Thank you Jason!!!!!!

(Of course this means I have mismatched tires…but they will get me to Sault Ste. Marie where I can get a new pair of touring tires at a proper bike shop.)

And finally!

Bingo winners!

We have two bingo winners! I haven’t asked their permission to post their names…so I won’t…but they are getting some awesome souvenirs!

Now some pictures.

Quetico Provincial Park

Just Canadian things

Notice the “Earth is flat” graffiti!

A feast suitable for royalty!

View of Superior from my campground!

July 18: Not quite 100 miles

Bingo word: Soooo much rain!

Okay let me start with some stats for today:

Distance: 153 km

Duration: 8:29:02

Average speed: 18 kph

Metres climbed: 925

I am super happy with my day, even though I didn’t quite make it to 100 miles. I could have ridden loops around the campground…but I didn’t have the will to do it. Besides, another nasty storm was coming up hard. Fortunately I was able to set up before it hit…and when it did, the heavens unleashed another deluge. There was soooo much rain! I escaped pretty well, but Coco got a lot of water in his tent.

We dragged a picnic table into the men’s washroom so we could cook dinner while we waited for the storm to finish hating on us. There are only 2 other campers here…in RVs…so we figured we wouldn’t be inconveniencing anyone.

Not sure what tomorrow will look like. We’re still 200km from Thunder Bay…and there isn’t much by way of stores or campgrounds along the way. As in…there is one store and one campground between here and Thunder Bay. And they are 40km from here. I suspect I’ll be getting my century ride soon enough.

July 17: Tornado warning

Bingo word: Caught in a storm

Coco and I met up again in Prawda, MB. He’s a much stronger rider than me, so we don’t ride together…but we always plan where to meet for the night.

On Monday we only managed 25km because of a wild thunderstorm. We were able to get to Rushing River Provincial Park and camped there. We can handle rain. Neither of us are willing to risk lightning.

Rushing River

Yesterday we had a good day of cycling and got in about 110km. We decided to wild camp last night and found an old logging road that led to a nice sandy area where we could pitch our tents. No bears and no raccoons visited us. I was surprised by that…but not disappointed.

Wild camping!

Today was a wild weather day again. It poured all afternoon, but we fought the rain and headwind and got to Fort Francis. Looking at the forecast, we decided to book into a motel. There was more wild weather coming our way.

As we were eating dinner in a restaurant, everyone’s phone starting beeping wildly. We were all getting a tornado warning. There was a little bit of a collective freak out. Some people went over to the window to see what was happening. Others were asking the servers where they should hide. It was a thing!

Nothing happened right away so—wisely or unwisely—Coco and I decided to make a dash for the Safeway two blocks over. As we were getting supplies for the next few days, the heavens unleashed its fury. The wind was fierce. There was a deluge of rain. And the lightning was ferocious. We had 2km to cycle to get to our motel. A kind stranger told us to throw our bikes in the back of his work van and he gave us a ride instead. But we still got soaked!

I am so happy we didn’t stay in a campground tonight. We both have really good tents…but I’m pretty sure we would have either floated away or be blown away.

Tomorrow will be my first century ride on a loaded touring bike!

July 15: Slowed by storms

Bingo word: Northern Ontario

It has been two days of intense and scary storms. And I’m exhausted. So here are just some pictures.

Met up with Coco again in Prawda, MB

Zoom in and you’ll see Jupiter!
Hiding from rain in Prawda

At first I thought this is all the welcome I was going to get!
A proper welcome!
I’m still on fire!

Just baby deer in a front yard in Kenora
These clouds had me pedalling hard
Rushing River
Old man Andres

July 13: Horsefly apocalypse

Bingo word: Blackflies

As I was cycling out of the prairies today, I was reminded of a little known doctrinal dispute in the early church. The dispute centred around an ambiguity in the book of Revelations. Basically the debate was this. What would the horsemen of the apocalypse be riding? Would they be riding on flying horses, or on horseflies? The Greek is truly ambiguous here, and some early scholars thought that the Apostle John was just enjoying some wordplay at the expense of his readers. Other scholars took it to be a matter of serious doctrinal importance.

Those who supported the horsefly-reading of the Greek had a simple argument: we have never seen a flying horse, but we have seen a horsefly. Those opposed to this view were incredulous…and accused their opponents of a ridiculous equivocation.

As with any scholarly debate, petty politics quickly entered into the mix. Things got so fractious that the early church leaders called a council…the lesser known Council of the Stables.

I don’t want to bore you with the details of the Council, but a spectacular three-part documentary was made about how the flying-horses-reading of the Greek took priority in forming church doctrine. It is definitely worth the watch. Though the documentary itself is not without controversy. The creators of the documentary decided to refer to the flying horsemen as the Nazgûl. An odd choice, for sure, since there is no textual support for that name at all. But for the most part, it’s a good documentary.

For the longest time I was convinced by the documentary. Surely the horsemen would be riding flying horses. That was until today, when I caught a glimpse of what a horsefly apocalypse would look like. Seriously…there were so many of them…and they were huge! I even saw one fly away with a horse. An actual, for real horse! Perhaps if the Council of the Stables had taken place in eastern Manitoba, the debate would still be raging on.

TL;DR – Lots of horseflies. Huge, angry, flesh-eating horseflies. And they swarmed around me as I frantically pedalled east.

One of these things is not like the others!